Dizzy

Archive for the ‘Protest Songs’ Category

I Wouldn’t Want to be Like You

In Alan Parsons Project, Comic Relief, Dance Rally, Dr. Evil, Funky, Groovy, Music, Philosophy, Protest Songs, Robots, Rock, Silly, WDIZ! on September 15, 2012 at 7:57 pm

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Yo, Evil! How do you like the business end of MY Alan Arsons Project, baby? Dig. πŸ˜‰

Hey, cats and kittens, welcome to the inaugural WDIZ! Dance Rally! Yay!

Here to give us a funky, kick-ass start is The Allan Parsons Project with 1977’s I Wouldn’t Want to be Like You off their album I, Robot.

I ❀❀❀❀❀ this song. The tolling, quiet, beating scarcity of the introduction builds into a percussion crescendo, which collides with the fullness of the rhythm section. And… Uh, yeah! It’s just SO groovy and funky! Killer, dirty bass line. Funky riff. It all just flows. It’s tied up all nice and tight at the end, too. A fave of all Time and Space. You can’t help but dance and groove. That’s actually the challenge, baby. Uh, yeah. I’m challenging you to funk your ass off to give Evil a run for his money!

Please?

Hey?

Dance?

Yes?

YESSS!

Oh! And Scott sends his regards…

Ready? Dance Rally! Let’s show Evil exactly what kinda Sirius-ly stern, groovy-good shit we’re made of. And how! Now… DANCE! 😜 lol

Biko

In Ad Astra per Ardua, Apartheid, Loss, Music, Peter Gabriel, Politics, Protest Songs, Steve Biko, Tributes, Ugh on September 12, 2012 at 12:41 am

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Bantu Stephen Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977)

Graphic: Creative Corner

πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

The man is dead. The man is dead.

Stephen Biko, political activist and ideological leader of the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM), was only thirty years old when he died in detention under mysterious circumstances on 12 September, 1977. His political career was brief, but had a profound impact on the liberation struggle. He espoused the philosophy of black consciousness, linking identity politics and social action.

Biko first became involved in liberation politics through the National Union of South African Students (NUSAS) while attending medical school. His views on black identity and pride led to the formation and expansion of the South African Students’ Organisation (SASO) in the late 1960s. Biko served as both the president and publicity secretary for this body, which served as the nucleus of the BCM. He founded the Black People’s Convention (BPC) and was banned by the South African State in 1973. This new movement empowered a generation of young black South Africans, fuelling revolutionary events, including the 16 June 1976 Soweto Uprising.

Biko’s prolific writings, political lobbying, and his community activism drew the attention of the Security Police, and he was detained on numerous occasions. His life was adversely affected in many ways, including expulsion from the University of Natal in 1972, his first banning in 1973, and, ultimately, his death in detention on 12 September, 1977. He is regarded as a martyr of the liberation struggle. His 18 August 1977 detainment included severe torture at the hands of security police. He was interrogated for twenty two hours, and beaten until he suffered brain damage. He was chained to a window grille and denied medical attention for his injuries. His injuries did not improve, but it was only on 11 September that he was taken to Pretoria for medical attention, but he died shortly after his arrival.

J.T. Kruger, then-Minister of Justice, denied that police had abused their internationally renowned detainee, arguing that his death was the result of hunger strike. An autopsy conducted by the late pathologist Jonathan Gluckman at the request of Biko’s family found that he had died of brain damage as a result of blows inflicted upon him during his detention. Gluckman’s report led to an inquest: no policemen were charged, but Biko’s family eventually received a settlement from the state. The cover-up of Biko’s death in detention was exposed by then-journalist Helen Zille in the Rand Daily Mail, edited by Allister Sparks. Zille had received evidence from Biko’s doctors, including Gluckman. Biko’s death sent shockwaves around the world, and his funeral, attended by ten thousand, resulted in nationwide incidents of social unrest. During the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) proceedings, four of the surviving policemen involved in Biko’s death were refused amnesty.

~ SAHA

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Mourners gather to pay their last respects at Steve Biko’s funeral in King William’s Town, 25 September 1977. Well over 10, 000 people attended β€” thousands more were prevented from attending by police roadblocks.

β€œThe most potent weapon of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.”

~ Steve Biko

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1987’s Cry Freedom, a Richard Attenborough film

πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

Ad Astra per Ardua

Freedom!

πŸ˜’πŸ’œπŸ’‹

The Great Song of Indifference

In Bob Geldof KBE, Politics, Protest Songs, Syria, Ugh on July 24, 2012 at 12:21 am

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What gives with Syria? Maybe if they had as much black gold as Libya someone would have intervened by now? Ya think? Or was the Libya ‘thing’ just a personal grudge-match masquerading as liberation? Hey, I’m not a fan of Gadhafi’s work, either. Just sayin’, is all…

What gives? Why has this scenario been allowed to deteriorate to such a degree? I mean, do I have to ask? Will someone please make it stop? Please?

They’re killing people indiscriminately. They have been for quite some time. They’ve proven they won’t stop. Can’t?

Please, make them stop…? Now. Right now…

Or have we become that indifferent…?

Don’t Frack My Mother

In Comic Relief, Environment, Fracking, Groovy, Jimmy Fallon, Mother Earth, Music, Nifty, Oil & Gas, Peace, Philosophy, Protest Songs, Sean Lennon, Silly on July 14, 2012 at 11:30 am

Give it up, cats and kittens! Ummmmm, fracking, I mean. πŸ˜‰

Could I possibly be any more in ❀❀❀❀❀ with these three? Don’t think so.

❀❀❀❀❀

I live in fairly close proximity to Mordor. They like their fracking there. Love their ‘precious’ a whole heap, too…

A little background on fracking:

Hydraulic fracturing is the propagation of fractures in a rock layer, as a result of the action of a pressurized fluid. Some hydraulic fractures form naturally- certain veins or dikes are examples- and can create conduits along which gas and petroleum from source rocks may migrate to reservoir rocks. Induced hydraulic fracturing or hydrofracking, commonly known as fracking, is a technique used to release petroleum, natural gas (including shale gas, tight gas and coal seam gas), or other substances for extraction. This type of fracturing creates fractures from a wellbore drilled into reservoir rock formations.

The first use of hydraulic fracturing was in 1947 but the modern fracking technique that made the extraction of shale gas economical was first used in 1997 in the Barnett Shale in Texas. The energy from the injection of a highly pressurized fracking fluid creates new channels in the rock, which can increase the extraction rates and ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons.

Proponents of fracking point to the vast amounts of formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons the process can extract. Detractors point to potential environmental impacts, including contamination of ground water, risks to air quality, the migration of gases and hydraulic fracturing chemicals to the surface, surface contamination from spills and flowback and the health effects of these. For these reasons hydraulic fracturing has come under scrutiny internationally, with some countries suspending or even banning it.

~ Wikipedia

Sooooo, yeah. Please, don’t frack my mother? Uh, thanks, baby. πŸ˜‰ πŸ’‹